Thoughts on construction law from Christopher G. Hill, Virginia construction lawyer, LEED AP, mediator, and member of the Virginia Legal Elite in Construction Law

Wow! Almost a Year as a Solo Construction Lawyer! (Lessons Learned)

Originally posted 2014-09-23 10:59:50. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

A Year as a Solo Construction AttorneyI find it almost hard to believe, but I’ve been the only member of The Law Office of Christopher G. Hill, PC for almost a year now. On July 1, 2011 it will be official, I will have been solo for a full year.

The ride thus far has been amazing. Now that I’m almost a year in to my adventure in solo construction law practice, I’ve hit my stride. The initial chaos relating to the simple things such as billing and practice management (through Clio) and accounting, not to mention marketing and servicing clients “without a net” has died down and I’m able to essentially automate the office processes and routines. Thanks to the internet and the wonders of the “cloud,” I am able to make my construction practice mobile and accessible from just about anywhere (except those few places without a link to the net). This allows me to access files from home or office with ease and get to client documents in a pinch if I’m not in the office. In short, through the use of technology, I can perform as well or better for my Virginia construction clients with increased flexibility and lower overhead.

My choice (at no small urging from my lovely wife) to rent office space was a good one. While many solo lawyers practice from home, I am not one of them. The expense of the space is more than outweighed by the productivity gains I get from a clear, physical separation between home and office. I also know that home has many distractions that don’t exist here at the office. I admire those that can work from home, but I am not one who could productively work from home.

The client response has been amazing as well. Not only have I not been hurt by my position as a solo, I have picked up some clients in no small measure because of my status as a solo. The flexibility and smaller overhead, as well as my ability to empathize with a clientele (contractors, subcontractors and other construction pros) that are business owners, are great selling points. Thank you to all of my present, past and future construction clients for your support. Without all of you, my practice would not be as fulfilling or thriving as it is.

Finally, thanks to all of my friends, whether in the construction world or elsewhere, that have supported me during the past year. Your thoughts and suggestions have been well taken and are greatly appreciated.

While solo practice is not for every one, the last year has shown me that my decision to go solo was probably the best professional career decision I could have made.

As always, I welcome your comments below. Please subscribe to keep up with this and other Construction Law Musings.

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18 Responses to Wow! Almost a Year as a Solo Construction Lawyer! (Lessons Learned)

  1. […] When I made the decision to go solo with my construction law practice, I knew I wanted to have flexibility to serve my client base of contractors and subcontractors in Virginia. I started some flat rate billing and had the ability to take cases that were below the dollar value of those that my old firm was willing to take. I also knew that I would be a master of my own destiny for better or worse (and it has been much more of the former than the latter). […]

  2. […] When I made the decision to go solo with my construction law practice, I knew I wanted to have flexibility to serve my client base of contractors and subcontractors in Virginia. I started some flat rate billing and had the ability to take cases that were below the dollar value of those that my old firm was willing to take. I also knew that I would be a master of my own destiny for better or worse (and it has been much more of the former than the latter). […]

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